The Good Thing About Prop. 29

The Good Thing About Prop. 29

As Prop. 29 vote looms, dialysis patients brace for change

By Jeff Smith, Special to CNN

Updated 10:04 AM ET, Thu March 20, 2016

In this Feb. 25, 2016 photo, a man uses an artificial hand made by the company Hologic to type on an electronic keyboard. About 60,000 people in the state of Texas have kidney failure, and about half of those who need the procedure must travel to one of the few U.S. hospitals able to perform the procedure right in their home.

Photo: HIDALGO COUNTY, Texas HIDALGO COUNTY, Texas HIDALGO COUNTY, Texas

In this Feb. 25, 2016 photo, a man uses an artificial hand made by…

Photo: HIDALGO COUNTY, Texas HIDALGO COUNTY, Texas

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In this Feb. 25, 2016 photo, a man uses an artificial hand made by the company Hologic to type on an electronic keyboard. About 60,000 people in the state of Texas have kidney failure, and about half of those who need the procedure must travel to one of the few U.S. hospitals able to perform the procedure right in their home.

Hidalfiion to the contrary, this one is a good thing.

While it is certainly true that many medical procedures are more expensive – and therefore more expensive for those of us who can’t afford them – the notion that we have to spend $500 for an operation simply because it is more cost-effective has gotten increasingly out of hand.

That notion, which is at the heart of Prop. 29, is so toxic to our health and economic well-being as to render the measure indefensible.

But even if Prop. 29 does pass, and even if Texas passes Prop. 61, which would effectively ban same-day surgery except for medically necessary procedures, a few things remain inevitable.

It’s going to cost money, and a lot of it.

So you’re going to have to have money. And you’re going to have to make a lot of it. So you’re going to have to be the kind of people who understand your limits and the lengths you have to go to meet them. Like a lot

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